Procrastination No-No!

Procrastination in college is on an entirely new level than procrastination in high school.  You thought waiting until after dinner in high school to write a paper that was assigned 2 weeks ago and is now due tomorrow is quality procrastination?  Try – college, 2am, paper due at 8am, haven’t even looked at assignment yet.  Yes my friends… procrastination at it’s finest!  Major problemo though!  The number one thing college students wish they knew before coming to college was how to manage their time.  Proper time management helps to avoid poor quality work,  avoids stress, keeps you organized, keeps you focused, and keeps you on task – all things that lead toward a successful college experience.

There are a variety of excuses that all you procrastinators use.  i.e. ‘I have to log on to facebook to see what’s happening’ ‘I need to call my boyfriend and settle our problems right this second’ (problems already? buh-bye) ‘I have to hang out with my friends’ ‘I need to take a nap’ keep going?…. okay, ‘I can’t study right now, i’m not in the right mood’ ‘I have to take a break before I start my work’ ‘I have to party tonight otherwise i’ll be wasting my college experience’

NONSENSE my friends…. get your shit together.  Instead of using the words i have to and i need to use the words i choose to.  You don’t have to or need to do any of those things, you all choose the things you do in college.  You don’t have to call your boyfriend instead of writing a paper, you choose to call your boyfriend.  You don’t have to start drinking at 7pm, you choose to.

ADVICE – There are a ton of resources on how to avoid procrastination and work on time management.  I will give you 1 piece of advice because I know that’s all you want to hear and statistically people only remember about 3 things that you tell them so I’ll bless you with just 1 thing and then you’ll have no choice but to remember it.  Here is it –> SCHEDULE LIBRARY STUDY TIME!  Every day have an hour that you just sit in the library and do work.  Make the library your space.  I did this when I was in college and it was the best decision ever.  I would sit down in the library during my ‘time’ and force myself to do work, even if it wasn’t due until the next week or two.  This made the library my ‘work time’ and my dorm room my ‘relaxing and fun time’.  If you are constantly putting work off until later you will constantly be thinking about.  When you’re sitting in your room or on your bed (when you should be content) you will be stressed because you will always thinking about the work that needs to get done.  If you force yourself to go to the library for at least an hour every day you will stay on top of your work and be able to use your room as an outlet away from work.  If you don’t have one space to associate with work (the library) then you will associate all of college with work and stress… train your mind and body to use the library as your work space and your dorm as your home… balance work life and home life (just like adults do in the real world, right?)

Okay, that post ended up being much longer than I wanted it to be.

Procrastinate | Later {haha}

{gab}

19 Things To Stop Doing In Your 20s

I read this blog post online and loved everything about it.  I don’t know Holden Desalles, but major points to him for writing this awesome article.  I’m reposting it for all of you!  Read up, read again, repeat.

~ 19 things to stop doing in your 20s ~

By Holden  Desalles

1. Stop placing all the blame on other people for how they interact  with you. To an extent, people treat you the way you want to be  treated. A lot of social behavior is cause and effect. Take responsibility for  (accept) the fact that you are the only constant variable in your equation.

2. Stop being lazy by being constantly “busy.” It’s easy to  be busy. It justifies never having enough time to clean, cook for yourself, go  out with friends, meet new people. Realize that every time you give in to your ‘busyness,’ it’s you who’s making the decision, not the demands of your job.

3. Stop seeking out distractions. You will always be able to  find them.

4. Stop trying to get away with work that’s “good enough.”People notice when “good enough” is how you approach your job. Usually these  people will be the same who have the power to promote you, offer you a health  insurance plan, and give you more money. They will take your approach into  consideration when thinking about you for a raise.

5. Stop allowing yourself to be so comfortable all the time.  Coming up with a list of reasons to procrastinate risky, innovative decisions  offers more short-term gratification than not procrastinating. But when you stop  procrastinating to make a drastic change, your list of reasons to procrastinate  becomes a list of ideas about how to better navigate the risk you’re taking.

6. Stop identifying yourself as a cliche and start treating yourself  as an individual. Constantly checking your life against a prewritten  narrative or story of how things “should” be is a bought-into way of life. It’s  sort of like renting your identity. It isn’t you. You are more nuanced than the  narrative you try to fit yourself into, more complex than the story that “should” be happening.

7. Stop expecting people to be better than they were in high school — learn how to deal with it instead. Just because you’re out of high  school doesn’t mean you’re out of high school. There will always be people in  your life who want what you have, are threatened by who you are, and will  ridicule you for doing something that threatens how they see their position in  the world.

8. Stop being stingy. If you really care about something,  spend your money on it. There is often a notion that you are saving for  something. Either clarify what that thing is or start spending your money on  things that are important to you. Spend money on road trips. Spend money on  healthy food. Spend money on opportunities. Spend money on things you’ll  keep.

9. Stop treating errands as burdens. Instead, use them as  time to focus on doing one thing, and doing it right. Errands and chores are  essentially rote tasks that allow you time to think. They function to get you  away from your phone, the internet, and other distractions. Focus and attention  span are difficult things to maintain when you’re focused and attentive on X  amount of things at any given moment.

10. Stop blaming yourself for being human. You’re fine.  Having a little anxiety is fine. Being scared is fine. Your secrets are fine.  You’re well-meaning. You’re intelligent. You’re blowing it out of proportion.  You’re fine.

11. Stop ignoring the fact that other people have unique perspectives  and positions. Start approaching people more thoughtfully. People will  appreciate you for deliberately trying to conceive their own perspective and  position in the world. It not only creates a basis for empathy and respect, it  also primes people to be more open and generous with you.

12. Stop seeking approval so hard. Approach people with the  belief that you’re a good person. It’s normal to want the people around you to  like you. But it becomes a self-imposed burden when almost all your behavior  toward certain people is designed to constantly reassure you of their  approval.

13. Stop considering the same things you’ve always done as the only  options there are. It’s unlikely that one of the things you’ll regret  when you’re older is not having consumed enough beer in your 20s, or not having  bought enough $5 lattes, or not having gone out to brunch enough times, or not  having spent enough time on the internet. Fear of missing out is a real, toxic  thing. You’ve figured out drinking and going out. You’ve experimented enough.  You’ve gotten your fill of internet memes. Figure something else out.

14. Stop rejecting the potential to feel pain. Suffering is  a universal constant for sentient beings. It is not unnatural to suffer. Being  in a constant state of suffering is bad. But it is often hard to appreciate  happiness when there’s nothing to compare it to. Rejecting the potential to  suffer is unsustainable and unrealistic.

15. Stop approaching adverse situations with anger and  frustration. You will always deal with people who want things that seem  counter to your interests. There will always be people who threaten to prevent  you from getting what you want by trying to get what they want. This is  naturally frustrating. Realize that the person you’re dealing with is in the  same position as you — by seeking out your own interests, you threaten to thwart  theirs. It isn’t personal — you’re both just focused on getting different things  that happen to seem mutually exclusive. Approach situations like these with  reason. Be calm. Don’t start off mad, it’ll only make things more tense.

16. Stop meeting anger with anger. People will make you mad.  Your reaction to this might be to try and make them mad. This is something of a  first-order reaction. That is, it isn’t very thoughtful — it may be the first  thing you’re inclined to do. Try to suppress this reaction. Be thoughtful.  Imagine your response said aloud before you say it. If you don’t have to respond  immediately, don’t.

17. Stop agreeing to do things that you know you’ll never actually  do. It doesn’t help anyone. To a certain extent, it’s a social norm to  be granted a ‘free pass’ when you don’t do something for someone that you said  you were going to do. People notice when you don’t follow through, though,  especially if it’s above 50% of the time.

18. Stop ‘buying’ things you know you’ll throw away. Invest  in friendships that aren’t parasitic. Spend your time on things that aren’t  distractions. Put your stock in fleeting opportunity. Focus on the  important.

19. Stop being afraid.

Read more at http://thoughtcatalog.com/2012/19-things-you-should-stop-doing-in-your-20s/#PTUizW2DzMaykeqx.99

Professor Pet Peeves

Yes, some of your final grades are made up of just the graded material in class but professors are human and some can’t help but to give a little extra push for the all around exceptional students.  Every professor is different and every professor has different things that annoy them so this list does not speak for everyone.  However, I can almost guarantee that there is at least one thing on here that each of your current professors will agree with.  Read carefully, don’t be a pest!

  1. missing class regularly
  2. showing up late to class and making a scene
  3. texting (you’re not good at hiding it, who looks down at their crotch and laughs when they’re “taking notes” in class?)
  4. falling asleep
  5. asking a question that was JUST answered
  6. lame excuses for missing class
  7. talking to your friend sitting next to you
  8. eating a meal in class
  9. studying or doing work for another class
  10. saying that “you didn’t know the assignment was due”
  11. not completing the assigned reading prior to class
  12. complaining about how much work you have to do
  13. during exam review asking if it can be a take home test, group exam, or open book test (no, no and no)
  14. wearing inappropriate clothing to class
  15. submitting horrendous work… this is college, there is an academic expectation, don’t embarrass yourself
  16. not saying a word during a discussion class
  17. showing up to office hours the day before an exam with 1000 questions because you never listened in class

Music in College

Don’t be afraid to blast your music in your room or play your favorite song on repeat as you and your friends get ready.  In fact, I suggest you find a song you love and play it on repeat as you begin your night.  Songs will attach themselves to memories.  Keep track of these songs, save them in a file.  In the future when you come across these songs or happen to hear them on a ‘oldies’ radio station it will bring back great memories from some of the best years of your life.

Blast | The | Music

{gab}

It Really Doesn’t Matter

Things that happen now that seem like the end of the world really do become funny with a little bit of time and distance.  The quicker you move on from an embarrassing moment, the quicker you can laugh about it.  I promise… it’s really not that bad.

Embarrass | Yourself

 

Choosing a Major

You are annoyed, you don’t want to think about picking a major, life would be much easier if someone just told you what you are good at.  An easy conversation starter at college is “what’s your major?” and while it has successfully started a conversation  it has once again reminded you that you have no idea what you want to study, that everyone else seems to know, and the wave of confusion and frustration sweep over you once again.  I may not be able to solve this problem and it may take you much more time to figure out what you want to major in.  In fact, you may just get fed up and pick a major by throwing a dart at a list of majors your school offers (not a bad idea you think) because you are simply running out of time and the pressure from your advisor and parents is forcing you to just choose anything.

Rest assured you do not need to panic – you do not need to know right now.

Choosing a major is not the same thing as choosing what you want to do with the rest of your life.  It simply means what you want to do with your life upon graduating.  Heck, I was an accounting major and upon graduating I never once took a step in the doors of an accounting office.  Take off some of that pressure because your major will help you with your first job but studies show that most people will change careers about four or five times over the course of their lives and there is no major that exists that will prepare you for that.

That brings me to my advice/things to think about when picking a major:

  1. What things in life excite you?  Think about the times during your day when you have the most fun. (Don’t think too hard, if you have the most fun picking out an outfit – admit it!  You can tailor a major around anything)
  2. Make a work criteria list that you would want (i.e. manage people, easy work life balance, 9am-5pm, work alone, no travel, fast pace) if this is the case yet you’re telling yourself you want to work in finance, you need to realize that your wants don’t match up to a career in finance.  These are now things you can ask your advisor about or bring up with employers during interviews or informal meetings on campus.
  3. Go to the admissions office or the registrars office and pick up a course catalog – it has all the majors your school offers and classes you will take within that major.  Do some research.
  4. Meet with professors.  Many of them have worked in the field that they teach.  Ask them what the career is like.
  5. Finally….suck it up and pick something.  You don’t want to waste your time in college.  Pick anything that you even remotely enjoy (you don’t have to love it).  Once you pick it you can then use the remainder of your time at college working to get an internship and eventually a job.  This may sound pushy but you all need to understand that once you pick you major it doesn’t mean you miraculously get handed a job in that field.  Picking your major is the first step.  You will need to use the time from when you declare that major to the time when you accept your first job offer to build up that lovely piece of paper we call a resume.  So yes… if you’re still complaining because you have no idea what you want to study my kind words of advice are…. suck it up and throw a dart.

With | Love

{GMS}