How To Find Your Perfect Job

perfect jobI never wanted a job that was just a job. I always wanted to be one of those people who was an example of ‘if you love what you do, you won’t work a day in your life.’ Who doesn’t?? College students focus too much figuring out what job they want and not enough time on identifying the qualities of life they want in that job. If I ask a student what job they want, they usually don’t know but they wish they knew what they wanted to do. However, if I asked a student if they wanted a job where there could travel, they would have an answer. If I asked a student if they wanted a job that would allow them to climb the corporate ladder, they would have an answer. In order to figure out your dream job, I suggest you first think about the qualities of your perfect job. From that list you can then identify careers and specific companies who may be able to fulfill those qualities. Figuring out your dream job will also help you figure out what major you should declare. A lot of you “undeclared” folk should especially create a lit. If you need some ideas see my personal criteria for my perfect job below:

Criteria for my perfect job
• Work with intelligent/educated people (I always want to learn from those who are smarter than me)
• Have work/life balance (that weighs heavy on the ‘life’ side)
• Complete small projects – to see accomplishments quickly
• Be able to see change (seeing change that I did motivates me for the next project)
• Ability to advance within the company (I’m a climber, I need to always have something to work towards)
• Training opportunities for employees (Again, I always like to climb and improve)
• Work with people (I can’t sit at a cubicle and stare at a computer screen all day)
• People bale to provide people information that I have, that will benefit their life (I want to advise people)
• Have a mentor (it’s helpful for your personal health to have someone you can vent to, with the door shut)
• Opportunities to give back to the community

Make your list today! Feel free to use some of my criteria.

Pre-Finals Preparation

The semester is almost over which means that your dreaded final’s week will be here before you know it.  Yes, you can enjoy the rest of your semester by pushing everything aside until the week before finals and cramming the night away OR you can start preparing now!  If you start pre-finals preparation now you can do little by little to get organized without the stress and pressure of having to get it all done ASAP.  Here are some tips of how to get organized for pre-finals preparation:

  1. Separate your notes into folders or binders for each of your classes (especially if you’re one of those students who uses the same notebook or binder for all of your classes)
  2. Pick a class each day and create a new word document on your computer – as you flip through your notes start a list on your document with bullet points or if you’re feeling ambitious start a detailed outline of all your notes up to this point (when you go back to it the week before finals you will be REALLY happy to see everything you need to know, even if it’s just bullet points with key words to know)
  3. Figure out which classes you have final papers for and get the criteria now – starting your papers (even just an intro and then notes of what you will talk about) during Thanksgiving break will make it much easier when you come back to campus and work on your paper.  When you sit down to write a paper the hardest part is starting it but if you start it during Thanksgiving you will be ahead of the game right before finals and you’ll save yourself a lot of stress.
  4. Get Healthy! Eat right, get exercise, and sleep!  Force yourself to eat some veggies and go take a walk, take a fitness class, or spend some time at the gym – healthy body, healthy mind!

First | Semester | Almost | Over

{gabbriel m simone}

Choosing a Major

You are annoyed, you don’t want to think about picking a major, life would be much easier if someone just told you what you are good at.  An easy conversation starter at college is “what’s your major?” and while it has successfully started a conversation  it has once again reminded you that you have no idea what you want to study, that everyone else seems to know, and the wave of confusion and frustration sweep over you once again.  I may not be able to solve this problem and it may take you much more time to figure out what you want to major in.  In fact, you may just get fed up and pick a major by throwing a dart at a list of majors your school offers (not a bad idea you think) because you are simply running out of time and the pressure from your advisor and parents is forcing you to just choose anything.

Rest assured you do not need to panic – you do not need to know right now.

Choosing a major is not the same thing as choosing what you want to do with the rest of your life.  It simply means what you want to do with your life upon graduating.  Heck, I was an accounting major and upon graduating I never once took a step in the doors of an accounting office.  Take off some of that pressure because your major will help you with your first job but studies show that most people will change careers about four or five times over the course of their lives and there is no major that exists that will prepare you for that.

That brings me to my advice/things to think about when picking a major:

  1. What things in life excite you?  Think about the times during your day when you have the most fun. (Don’t think too hard, if you have the most fun picking out an outfit – admit it!  You can tailor a major around anything)
  2. Make a work criteria list that you would want (i.e. manage people, easy work life balance, 9am-5pm, work alone, no travel, fast pace) if this is the case yet you’re telling yourself you want to work in finance, you need to realize that your wants don’t match up to a career in finance.  These are now things you can ask your advisor about or bring up with employers during interviews or informal meetings on campus.
  3. Go to the admissions office or the registrars office and pick up a course catalog – it has all the majors your school offers and classes you will take within that major.  Do some research.
  4. Meet with professors.  Many of them have worked in the field that they teach.  Ask them what the career is like.
  5. Finally….suck it up and pick something.  You don’t want to waste your time in college.  Pick anything that you even remotely enjoy (you don’t have to love it).  Once you pick it you can then use the remainder of your time at college working to get an internship and eventually a job.  This may sound pushy but you all need to understand that once you pick you major it doesn’t mean you miraculously get handed a job in that field.  Picking your major is the first step.  You will need to use the time from when you declare that major to the time when you accept your first job offer to build up that lovely piece of paper we call a resume.  So yes… if you’re still complaining because you have no idea what you want to study my kind words of advice are…. suck it up and throw a dart.

With | Love

{GMS}

Surviving The First Month

How is everyone?  I assume you are all in full swing at this point.  Classes and professors have loaded up the work, late night study dates have begun, and a new level of stress you didn’t know existed has now taken over your body.  This first month is critical for setting up the rest of your semester.  Don’t let bad habits take over.  Start to take control of your responsibilities.  Have you done to the gym yet?  Don’t let late night snacks and increased ‘liquid’ calories mess up your health.  Need a quick check up to make sure you’re doing the right things?  Read below on some Month One survival tips.  Are you doing them?  Did you remember to do them?  Have you even thought about them yet?  Enjoy!

1. Get to know your roommates – sit with them and really get to know them.  These are the people you are going to spend the most amount of time with. You don’t have to be their best friend but you do have to live with them (and they have to live with you).

2. Get Organized!  Your professor may have assigned work and projects and told you about them on day 1.  Don’t expect them to remind you everyday about it and if you forget to hand it in when it’s due you will not get away with the excuse ‘i didnt know it was due.’  Get a planner and fill in the dates when assignments are due.

3. Go to class – Sleeping in and skipping your morning class may seem tempting, who’s making you go anyway?  Get up and go!  You are paying to be there, don’t waste your money.

4. Meet with your professors.  Take the extra minute to show up before class or stay after class and meet your professor.  Ask them a question, or tell them that you are enjoying their class so far.  They’re human (everyone likes to be given complements) and they’ll appreciate the positive feedback.

5. Let go of the pressure of having to know exactly what you want to study – You’ve probably met a number of people who say they know exactly what they want to do when they graduate (i’d bet money that majority of those people have no idea what they want to do).  College is a time to discover what you want to do.  Let those people do what they want to do and be excited that you aren’t locked into one track right now, you are exploring!

6. Stay healthy! Go to the gym, eat your fruit and veggies, listen to music and go for a walk by yourself.

7. Take a deep breath – right now!….ahhh feel better?

8. Don’t cut corner – nobody got placed on the top of the mountain, they all had to climb it.

9. Seek help when you need it – are you really stressed?  Are your eating habits getting out of hand?  Are you drinking more than you expected?  Dont be afraid to ask for help.  Walk to health services (trust me they’ve seen and heard it all) and tell them what is going on.  Are you confused on an assignment?  E-mail your professor, reach out to a classmate or go to the tutoring center.  People want to help you.

1o. Call home to your family – they miss you, they want to hear from you.  Do you love your family?  Tell them.

 

Building Your Resume From Scratch

Everyone wants to be at the top of the mountain but nobody wants to climb it.

School has started.  For those of you who are returning college students, ‘welcome back!’  For you new freshman, ‘welcome!’  For you new students, even you returning ones, you might look back on all you have done throughout high school and pat yourself on the back.  You may have been class president, a class officer, member of an honor society, member of an organziation, you won the community service award, you were captain of your varsity sports team, maybe you were even valedictorian, or won a college scholarship because of how super smart you were in your science classes in high school.  Well, let me first off say ‘congrats’ and then let me say ‘your high school success or lack thereof doesn’t actually matter as you make the transition to college.

You’ve worked so hard to get to where you are today and yes, now i am going to tell you that it’s time to start over.  Did you enjoy being successful in high school?  Did you dislike being a bum and now you want to revamp your life?  Either way you have to start back at the bottom and work your way up.  Freshman, this is your time to!  Returning students, it’s never too late to get started.  The majority of your schools will probably provide an involvement fair at the beginning of the semester.  Go to it!  Learn about different organizations and just sign up for one.  If you go there with too much enthusiasm and sign up for a bunch of groups you will overwhelm yourself and probably not attend any meetings.  Find one group you like, sign up for it and attend their meeting.  Help with one project in that group and work on it until it is accomplished.  Then, onto the next project.  What do we call this????…..climbing back up!

The Classroom

Difference #3 – On a more serious note here let’s talk about the classroom.  The classroom experience is very different in college than it is in high school.  For one thing, you’ll very quickly stop using the term Mr. or Mrs. and instead start calling all college teachers ‘professor’ or ‘Dr.’  It’s a strange transition at first but… get used to it.  In terms of how you are expected to learn is also very different.  In H.S. your teachers tell you want to study, you memorize the material and then spit it all onto the test and then forget everything as soon as you leave the classroom.  I was guilty of it, honestly couldn’t tell you one thing I learned in H.S.  In college you are expected to be engaged in the classroom.  You will learn to think differently, you will be expected to have your own opinion in which it will be encouraged to question the topics in course, fight for your opinion and debate topics (professor’s love this!).  They will not tell you what is most important but rather give you A LOT of material and leave the opinion up to you.  This is challenging especially when studying for exams.  Professors might give you hundreds of pages to study but then only ask a question from one section of the text.  Also, while you should respect your professors it is not uncommon to become friends with them and sit and chat over coffee about careers, life, classwork, etc.  Overall… don’t go into your classes expecting to be spoon fed answers,  learn to ask questions and form your own thoughts and opinions in class (if you think they will make you sound like a geek see my post below…geeks are COOL!) For the sake of all in academia, take control of your education and get excited about your classes!  

*Note – During the beginning of the school year I will be talking about what professors DO and DO NOT like about students.  Make sure to check back!!

Happy Friday!

G